The DAILY Message for Thursday October 1st, 2015

September 30, 2015

“Things I tell I can SELL (Sharing Expertise Leverages Life).”

Derrick Hayes is known as the “Encouragement Speaker” and is available for speaking engagements and Derricknym signings at meetings, conferences, and events. Please visit http://www.DerrickHayes.com email info@DerrickHayes.com  or call (706) 615-1662 to book Derrick Hayes now.

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The DAILY Message for Tuesday June 30th, 2015

June 30, 2015

“Change Their Heart Before You Change Their FLAG (Faith Love And Grace).”

FLAG

Derrick Hayes is known as the “Encouragement Speaker” and is available for speaking engagements and Derricknym signings at meetings, conferences, and events. Please visit http://www.DerrickHayes.com email info@DerrickHayes.com  or call (706) 615-1662 to book Derrick Hayes now.


Please Remember: Holocaust Remembrance Day

April 15, 2015

KleinFamilyby Gene Klein (with Jill Klein, author of We Got the Water: Tracing my Family’s Path through Auschwitz)

It has been 70 years since I was liberated from a Nazi concentration camp. I was just a teenager then; I’m 87 now.  Holocaust Remembrance Day is April 15th, and I have been thinking about what I want you and your loved ones to remember about the Holocaust. I speak frequently about my experiences, and I am able to remind people about what happened, provide them with vivid descriptions, and answer their questions. But I am among the last of the survivors, and one day—sooner than I would like to think—we will all be gone.

Here is what I want you to remember after we are gone, when our memories must become yours, so that future generations will have the knowledge and compassion to avoid the mistakes of the past:

Please remember the life we had before it all started; before the name-calling, the bricks through the windows, long before the cattle cars and the camps. I was born into a middle class Hungarian family in a small town in the foothills of the Carpathian mountains. Our town was charming. We sat in outdoor cafes on summer evenings, and skated on the river on winter afternoons. My father owned a hardware store, was an avid soccer fan, and loved to tend to his garden. My mother took care of my two sisters and me, and was preoccupied with getting me—a naturally skinny kid—to eat more. We were not wealthy, but we had everything we needed. In the most basic of ways, we were not unlike you and your family. And we felt as secure as you do now.

Please remember that all of this was taken away. Within a few weeks in the spring of 1944, my father’s store was confiscated, my Jewish friends and I were told that we were no longer welcome at school, and we were forced to wear a yellow star. Then we were forced from our home, crowded into cattle cars, and taken to Auschwitz. When we arrived, the men were separated from the women, and then my father was separated from me. My father had been a POW in World War I, and during his years of imprisonment he learned to play the violin and to speak five languages. He was intelligent and humorous. I loved him the way any 16-year-old boy loves a wonderful father. The way you love your father, if you are lucky enough to have a good one. So imagine this: a man in a black uniform sends you to one direction and your father to another. You don’t know why, until the next day a veteran prisoner points up at the smoke coming out of a chimney and says, “Your father is up there.” Please remember my father.

Please remember that it is terribly easy for one group to strike another group off the roster of humanity, to see others as vermin or pests, as an affliction that must be destroyed. It happens again and again. And once it does, people are capable of inflicting terrible hardship and pain on others, and to feel they are righteous in doing so. None of the SS officers who ordered me—a starving teenager—to carry heavy steel rails up a hillside thought of themselves as monsters. They were adhering to their beliefs, and they were serving their country. We must be constantly vigilant for the descent that takes us from self-righteous beliefs, to the dehumanization of others and into the sphere of violence.

Please remember that while we are capable of all of this, we can also rise to amazing heights in the service of others. For two weeks I had the good fortune to have a respite from hard labor while I was assigned to work with a civilian German engineer who was surveying the landscape where future roads would be built. He saw the terrible conditions I was living under and decided to help. Everyday he hid food for me from the SS kitchen where he ate lunch. Chicken, milk, rice, and cheese left under a bench in the back corner of a barracks. He cared, he took a risk, and he saved my life. Please remember him.

And finally, remember that no one should be judged because of his or her nationality, religion or race. We were sent to the camps because propaganda was believed, individuality was erased, and hate was rampant. When asked if I am angry with Germans, I think of the German engineer, and know that individuals must be judged by their own personal actions. If I can hold this as a guiding principle after what happened to my family and me, then you can, too.

Please take my memories as yours, share them, and carry them forward. It is by doing so that you can help keep the next generation from forgetting, and help fill the space that we survivors will leave behind when we are gone.


Dear Little Black Boy

May 18, 2013

AlexhayesI almost didn’t write you because at one point in my life I did not want to be labeled as black. One thing I learned is that blackness is the fulfillment of light and darkness is the absence of light. People say that “the truth shall set you free.” The key to that is you have to have the truth in order to be free.

As you grow know that it is alright to ask, question or challenge any truth that is brought before you. Any truth. When you find out what life really has for you be careful who you share your truth with until you are ready to put your life on the line.

Malcolm X and Martin Luther King, Jr. wanted your dream to come true by any means necessary. They were killed before their prophecies were fulfilled.

Know your race and understand that you are always in a race. Stay on track so that when you come out of the starting blocks you can hurdle obstacles and relay information so that the baton of optimism is passed on from generation to generation.

Last week I watched a documentary entitled “Hidden Colors” where it shared information about how people of color contributed to the world that we live in today. One group of people that the video mentioned were the Moors. I think you should research the Moors and see for yourself that you come from greatness. It’s never too late to be great.

I love you and I want the best for you. Reading, writing and arithmetic are three tools that you can use to change any game or industry. If you read when I write, you can count on me to stay in touch. In love I write you to light you.

PS (Please Share) because in all of us is a Little Black Boy.

Sincerely,

Encouragement Speaker Derrick Hayes
info@derrickhayes.com
P.O. Box 8702 Columbus, Georgia 31908


DERRICK Interview with Multicultural Center Director Dr. Shakeer Abdullah

April 5, 2013

DrShakeerEncouragement Speaker Derrick Hayes gives a DERRICK Interview by asking 7 questions through each letter of his first name to give you an insightful perspective from other experts, entrepreneurs, celebrities and up and coming super stars.

Today’s DERRICK Interview is with Dr. Shakeer Abdullah who the Director of the Multicultural Center at Auburn University along with being an Author, Diversity Consultant, Host, and Motivational Speaker.

Dr. Abdullah has worked in the field of higher education for more than 15 years and has worked in a number of capacities related to diversity, leadership development, program management, strategic planning, and many other areas.

Dr. Abdullah’s passion for student success and higher education comes from his range of experiences in higher education as both a student and an administrator.

As an undergraduate student at Wittenberg University in Springfield, Ohio Shakeer took full advantage of all the opportunities that Witt had to offer.  He was a four-year letter man on a football team that won 3 conference championships and only lost four games in four years.  In addition to football, Shakeer joined a fraternity, served as the president of the Black student union, co-founded the school’s unity march, served on the campus programming committee, acted in the experimental theater troupe and much more.

Please watch our DERRICK Interview below and visit Dr. Shakeer Abdullah for more information.


DERRICK Interview with International Pop Artist Dalal Bruchmann

February 28, 2013

DalalLaceEncouragement Speaker Derrick Hayes gives a DERRICK Interview by asking 7 questions through each letter of his first name to give you an insightful perspective from other experts, entrepreneurs, celebrities and up and coming super stars.

Today’s DERRICK Interview is with Actress and Pop Artist Dalal Bruchmann who according to Hollywood Music Magazine is “A multitalented international rising star.” Influenced by Beethoven, Prince, Andrew Loyd Webber and Kylie Minogue, Dalal’s music has pushed her to the forefront of up and coming Pop artists. Her Debut Single “Taste the Night” reached #5 on the Billboard Breakout Charts, #7 on the UK Club Charts and #8 on the UK Pop Commercial Charts with a music video that premiered through AOL Music and gained over one million views.

The most added new independent artist 2011 on radio was born on Walpurgis Night, the Night that celebrates the coming of Spring. Dalal’s passion for acting, singing and modeling began in Austria, following a long a line of Artists, Composers and Musician. Dalal is a direct descendant of Franz Seraph von Bruchmann, lyricist for world-renowned composer Franz Schubert, and her mother, Maria Harmony, a painter and actress in the Shakespeare Theatre.

Dalal currently resides in New York City, where she began her musical career in the United States, writing and recording her Debut Single “Taste the Night” with Producer Michael Grant (Crazy Possessive, Body Shots).

D is for Dream. What is your dream, goals or what have you achieved?

My Dream is to create music that the world loves listening to. My goal is to create Art that resonates with people… that moves them 🙂 I think I’ve gotten so far as to accumulate the right ingredients to achieve what I’ve set out to do.

E is for Encourage. What encourages you?

Beautiful stories that inspire me and that encourage me to do what I love doing. Bad experiences that I came out of stronger that encouraged me to work harder, be better, act wiser… Great experiences that made me happy and have left me wanting to go further. Recognition. Whether it is through friends, family, fans …. A good word at the end of the day.Dalal

R is for Resource. What resources do you bring to the table that makes you unique or stand out?

I grew up with classical music, learning violin and piano and toured with orchestras throughout Europe, Egypt, Turkey… I’ve also written for Gospel choirs and studied Musical Theater, 3D Animation and Editing.

My love for the cinematic world also plays an important role when it comes to writing music and creating my live shows. I think my background, the way I grew up and the environment I was exposed to makes for an interesting mixture that is reflected in my work.

R is for Ready. When did you realize you were ready for what you are doing now?

I remember that I’ve always wanted to do what I do now. Music, Performing and the Arts in general always made me feel like I’ve come home. But I remember being on this road for a while, when I came to a point where I was on my way to turning my weakness into a possibility and honing the gift of my strength; when I was eager to take the next step and faster in my decision to accept the next challenge… I knew I was ready… and I wasn’t afraid.

I is for Individual. Name at least one person that you know that you feel others should learn about and why?

For me personally, it would be my Mother, I’ve never seen a stronger person in my life. Her work ethic and her attitude towards and her trust in life is incomparable to anything I’ve ever come across.

Also, I’ve just finished reading “Team of Rivals” by Doris Kearns Goodwin, so another answer would be Abraham Lincoln. It is simply amazing how he intentionally surrounded himself with people that were against him and ended up being loved and respected by those, who were his opponents or even enemies. That’s what I call a victory in every way. I think his strategic genius should be known to the whole world.

Also, I just revisited the story of Dan Millman, which I’ve found incredibly inspiring. He took 0% and turned it into 100%

C is for Continue. When you fail, things look bleak or are not optimistic what makes you want to continue?

It depends on the consequence of the failure how hard and long that process of finding your path again is and living it well. But my family and everyone that believes in me makes me wanna go onward and upward again. 🙂

K is for Key. What keys to success can you leave for upcoming entrepreneurs and leaders?

Oi! I really actually think it is a key-chain full of keys! 🙂 There are very many ways to succeed. I believe in making fast decisions. Trust your gut, do it! Cause if you end up having made the wrong decision you are just as fast in righting the wrong decision and getting back on track.

Visit Dalal for more information


DERRICK Interview with Filmmaker and 11 Time Author Travis Hunter

December 12, 2012

TravisHunter

Encouragement Speaker Derrick Hayes gives a DERRICK Interview by asking 7 questions through each letter of his first name to give you an insightful perspective from other experts, entrepreneurs, celebrities and up and coming super stars.

Today’s DERRICK Interview is with Travis Hunter who is an author, mentor and father.  His first novel, The Hearts of Men, was originally published in 2000 by Hunter’s own company, Jimrose Publishing House. During the 2000 Book Expo America in Chicago, Hunter handed out copies of his self-published debut and one week later received an offer from Random House’s imprint, Striver’s Row/Villard, for the re-release of The Hearts of Men.

Hunter lives in a suburb of Atlanta with his son Rashaad. He is the founder of The Hearts of Men Foundation, Inc., through which he mentors and provides meaningful opportunities for underprivileged and at risk teens.

D is for Dream. What is your dream, goals or what have you achieved? I’ve written eleven novels, One off Broadway Stage Play and I wrote, directed and produced a short film based on my novel, Dark Child so I have achieved a lot in terms of the goals I set for myself. But I’m always pushing to take it to the next level.

E is for Encourage. What encourages you? I’m encouraged by many things. One is my family. I want to lead a life where a real legacy is involved. Another is in the past I had a huge fear of failure which kept me from trying things that I believe would’ve given me lots of fulfillment.

R is for Resource. What resources do you bring to the table that makes you unique or stand out? I’m very creative so that’s my gift. I’m also a very happy person by nature, so I try to bring joy to every occasion.

R is for Ready. When did you realize you were ready for what you are doing now? I gained confidence in my writing as my readers provided feedback on my first novel. It (The Hearts of Men) became required reading at Florida State when I didn’t even have a degree.

I is for Individual. Name at least one person that you know that you feel others should learn about and why? Wow. That’s a good question and I don’t I have a solid answer. I think people should learn more about our history and not the tidbits they give you in your school text. African Americans are a very resilient group and I think if the kids today learned more about our history, they might not take life for granted as many of them do.

C is for Continue. When you fail, things look bleak or are not optimistic what makes you want to continue? I’m in the business of writing books for black people so I go through my feast or famine moments. My son keeps me motivated and once again that fear of failure.

K is for Key. What keys to success can you leave for upcoming entrepreneurs and leaders? You have to stick to your goals, write out a business plan and tweak it as needed. Trust yourself. There is no such thing as job security anymore, so you have to believe and invest in your own vision. After all you wouldn’t fire yourself.

Is there anything that we did not touch on that you would like to inspire others with? Life is what you make it. Things may be tough, but so are you. If you think you can or if you think you can’t you are absolutely right. I think Henry Ford said that. Also my dad used to tell me; nothing comes to a sleeper but a dream. Wake up and start living.

Visit Travis Hunter for more information.