DERRICK Interview with Judge Angela Cox

October 5, 2015

JudgeCoxEncouragement Speaker Derrick Hayes gives a DERRICK Interview by asking 7 questions through each letter of his first name to give you an insightful perspective from other experts, entrepreneurs, celebrities and up and coming super stars.

Today’s DERRICK Interview is with Judge Angela Cox who is the 1st black female appointed in the 4th judicial circuit in Fl., A prominent & sought after speaker. Her passion-“to help others, find their purpose in life.”

In November of 2014, Governor Rick Scott appointed Judge Cox to the Circuit Court bench. Prior to her appointment, she served as a County Court Judge for nine years… after being appointed by Governor Jeb Bush in 2005.

She attended Tennessee State University as an undergrad and received her J.D. Degree from the University of Memphis School of Law.

Judge Cox serves her community by being a mentor, as a committed volunteer in her local church, as a volunteer for the Justice Teaching Initiative in Duval County Public and Private Schools… and as a member of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Incorporated.

Judge Angela M. Cox is a Detroit native. Her story will have you in tears and leave you, inspired. From young-to old- Judge Cox engages her audiences – and leaves them with the desire to find their passion and purpose in life.

D is for Dream. What is your dream, goals or what have you achieved?

My dream was to become a member of the judiciary in the State of Florida. I achieved my goal and my dream became a reality when I was first appointed by Governor Jeb Bush in 2005 to our County Court and then appointed in 2014 by Governor Rick Scott to our Circuit Court as the first African American Woman in the 4th Judicial Circuit of Florida.

E is for Education. What is your educational background and how do you use it daily?

Bachelor’s Degree in Criminal Justice from Tennessee State University.

Juris Doctor from Cecil C. Humphrey’s School of Law at the University of Memphis.

I use my degrees every single day since receiving them. I practiced Criminal Prosecution and I serve in the Criminal Division of the Circuit Court.

R is for Resource. What resources do you bring to the table that makes you unique or stand out?

The ability  to motivate others to find their purpose in life.

R is for Ready. When did you realize you were ready for what you are doing now?

The process of knowing I was and am ready is continuous. When I was 17, my only sibling who was 18 was shot and killed. I knew then that I wanted to be a criminal prosecutor and one day a Judge. Getting to that place was no easy feat but as I moved in the direction of my goal, I knew I was exactly where I was meant to be.

I is for Individual. Name at least one individual in your network that others should learn more about and why?

My husband, Sgt. Travis Cox. He is an intelligent, articulate, hardworking, and valued member of our law enforcement community.  He embodies the definition of a professional. He makes me and everyone he encounters want to be their very best.

C is for Challenges. What challenges have you had to overcome?

I grew up in less than ideal circumstances in Detroit, Michigan. My mother was addicted to drugs so my primary care was left to my grandmother and then my aunt when I was 15 and my grandmother died. I had a terrible attitude because I felt that life wasn’t fair but my aunt stressed that if I didn’t like the life I was living, to change it. So I did. Hard work, a better attitude,   taking responsibility for my actions, making better choices, choosing the right friends and taking advantage of the opportunities afforded to me helped me to live my best life.

K is for Key. What keys to success can you leave for upcoming entrepreneurs and leaders?

Live a life of integrity. Be a person of your word. Be on time, all the time. Have a vision for the areas of your life, write it down and make a plan to bring the vision to pass. Don’t let the answer “no” steal your dream, all you need is one yes.

Visit Judge Angela Cox for more information.

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Dear OBAMA Please Help Save Our HBCU’s

March 12, 2015

President_Barack_ObamaDear Barack Obama:

Greetings Mr. President. I recently read an article about your views on Historically Black Colleges and Universities on the website www.crewof42.com.

Do you really think that some HBCU’s are not good at graduating students and that if they don’t improve that they will have to go by the wayside? This is a case of many non HBCU’s as well.

The question should be what can we do to strengthen them and keep HBCU’s from falling apart?

I’m a graduate of Tennessee State University and since I was presented an opportunity to go to college before I graduated I helped start The Wall of Excellence Scholarship and Development Fund that has raised over $500,000.00 to help College of Business students continue and complete their education.

Through your name OBAMA here are 5 things that could be done to help keep HBCU’s alive.

O – Offer scholarships to males coming out of prison to help them re-enter the world and succeed.

B – Bring more jobs to cities where HBCU’s are located.

A – Assign mentors to students that qualify.

M – Move more soldiers out of war so that they can come back to college campuses.

A – Align banking partners with student entrepreneurs to allow them to start and build businesses before they graduate.

If these ideas won’t work for you please present some that will. The opportunity that an HBCU gave me saved my life. I documented this in my poem, “An HBCU Saved My Life.”

Growing up our Mothers gave us love

I turned to school and He turned to sell drugs

No high grades with passing test scores

My life seemed dark with no open doors

Apply anyway is what I heard my Mother say

If they all say no you can always go work for pay

Would I get in? My town would debate

One by one said yes, FAMU and Tennessee State

My friend that was dealing is no longer around

He was buried 6 feet deep when I came back to town

My work is now seen all over the nation

Only because I received a 1st class education

The things I seek and do

Happen because of seeds planted at my HBCU

Saving our sons and daughters we have to continue

Help each child keep school on their menu

I wrote this because “An HBCU Saved My Life”

The importance of HBCU’s was relevant years ago and they are still making an impact today. Just at my alma mater TSU alone graduates are currently empowering the world through television and technology.

Oprah Winfrey started with a show and now has the OWN brand that is currently partnering with Tyler Perry to help bring television to another level. Bobby Jones who is an HBCU graduate is the host of one of the longest running programs in television history. Jesse E. Russell is an HBCU graduate and is the one you have to thank for turning the car phone concept into a cell phone so that billions of people can talk to each other without having to be in the house or car.

No school or institution is perfect so with all due respect please use your Executive Order to help keep HBCU’s in order.

Derrick Hayes is known as the “Encouragement Speaker” and is available for speaking engagements and Derricknym signings at meetings, conferences, and events. Please visit http://www.DerrickHayes.com email info@DerrickHayes.com  or call (706) 615-1662 to book Derrick Hayes now.

 

 


DERRICK Interview with Shoe and Accessories Designer Wevly Wilson

October 8, 2014

wevlyEncouragement Speaker Derrick Hayes gives a DERRICK Interview by asking 7 questions through each letter of his first name to give you an insightful perspective from other experts, entrepreneurs, celebrities and up and coming super stars.

Today’s DERRICK Interview is with Wevly Wilson, a shoe and accessories designer who left Corporate America to follow her dreams. She has designed shoes and accessories for Ann Taylor Loft, Land’s End, Etienne Aigner, and Joe Fresh. She started her namesake brand of jewelry in 2009 and launched her online store in November 2013.

D is for Dream. What is your dream, goals or what have you achieved?

My dream is to build a successful fashion company that not only offers beautiful shoes, bags, and jewelry, but also supports its employees to lead full and balanced lives by providing flexible hours, generous vacation and personal time off, work at home opportunities, bring your pets to work, and to have on site child care. I want to provide an atmosphere of creative freedom, trust, and respect. I also desire for my company to support our community and students specifically by allowing them the opportunity to live their dreams by providing scholarships and other financial assistance. For me, it’s not just about profits and notoriety, I want to change how the American workforce operates.

E is for Education. What is your educational background and how do you use it daily?

I have a bachelor’s degree in Health Care Administration from Tennessee State University, a Master’s degree in Health Sciences from the University of Central Florida, and an Associate’s degree in Fashion Design from Parsons School of Design. I use the business skills that I learned from my undergrad and graduated education everyday when negotiating with suppliers and my factories, setting my retail and wholesales, prices, and just running the business in general. My design skills are utilized not only by contributing to my creative process but by being able to instruct factories and sample makers on how I want my product made.

R is for Resource. What resources do you bring to the table that makes you unique or stand out?

Being that I spent 7 years in Corporate America, more specifically in the pharmaceutical and medical devices industry, I came into the fashion industry with a business mentality, something that most designers lack. Therefore I was able to understand the business side of fashion along side the creative aspect.

R is for Ready. When did you realize you were ready for what you are doing now?

I knew I was ready to change careers when I realized that at the height of my Corporate career I was still unhappy. I knew that if I didn’t try to fully jump into fashion then that I would never do it.

I knew I was ready to start my own business when I saw other people around me branching off on their own. It reminded me that I never changed careers just to work for someone else, I always wanted my own line. So when I had a concept that I believed in, I put one foot in front of the other and started small.

I is for Individual. Name at least one individual in your network that others should learn more about and why?

Juliette Bench, founder and designer of Cape Cod Shoe Supply. Juliette is my fearless friend and former co worker that left her great job to follow her dreams of designing the perfect flip flop that reflected her beloved Cape Cod. She is an inspiration to me and also got me my first wholesale account!

C is for Challenges. What challenges have you had to overcome?

One of my biggest challenges is funding as it is with most small businesses. I overcame that initial obstacle be securing financing through the Tory Burch Foundation. With that money I was able to produce my jewelry in a factory in Shanghai China that also produces goods for Coach.

K is for Key. What keys to success can you leave for upcoming entrepreneurs and leaders?

My biggest key to success is to take baby steps and start somewhere. It can be overwhelming to look at a huge goal and wonder who you are going to accomplish it with limited time and resources. But if you decide to do 1 thing every week that will get you closer to your goal, that momentum will push and inspire you to keep going. Also read about other people that did what you want to do. There is always something that you can learn that will be of great value to you.

Visit Wevly Wilson for more information.


DERRICK Interview with Motivational Mentor Ed Wisdom III

May 3, 2014

Edspeaking1Encouragement Speaker Derrick Hayes gives a DERRICK Interview by asking 7 questions through each letter of his first name to give you an insightful perspective from other experts, entrepreneurs, celebrities and up and coming super stars.

Today’s DERRICK Interview is with Ed Wisdom, III, motivational speaker, mentor, and the founder of The Edward H. Wisdom Jr. Foundation established in 2012 in honor of his father who was murdered by an “at-risk” teen, has powered himself to the forefront with his initiatives on growth and empowerment in areas of manhood, fatherhood, youth, parenting, family and community. These initiatives include efforts in spiritual, philosophical, psychological, emotional, social, and financial development.Earlier this year, Wisdom was the keynote speaker for Black History Month at Austin Peay State University where he spoke on excellence and 2 Corinthians 8:7, “excel in everything.” Wisdom was the first African American keynote speaker at the governor’s 11th annual Tennessee Season To Remember in 2013 to honor and remember victims of homicide. Wisdom was also guest speaker at the Citywide Trayvon Martin Walk on Capitol Hill.

Wisdom has delivered his message all over the city, at prisons, juvenile detention centers, churches, schools,universities, throughout the media, and more. He explains how “iron sharpens iron, so one man sharpens another” to articulate to men that we have a responsibility in helping other individuals grow. Wisdom also conveys the idea that “a good man leaves behind a [legacy] for his children’s children” (Proverbs 13:22) promoting the leadership of men in powering families with gifts passed from generation to generation.

Wisdom is in Senior Management in Management Information Systems (MIS) at Vanderbilt University following his father’s, Ed Wisdom Jr., footsteps as he was the Directorof MIS at TSU. Wisdom not only followed his father in his career but in his heritage in character, integrity, and much more. Wisdom is a graduate of Tennessee State University (TSU), where he also earned his Masters’ degree in Business Administration with a concentration in Business Information Systems.

His son Erik Wisdom has followed these same footsteps earning a Bachelor’s of Business Administration in Business Information Systems at Tennessee State University, thus fulfilling the legacy good men leave behind “for their children’s children.”

Ed Wisdom III was the creator of The Gentleman’s Agreement: The Rebirth of the Black Man, held at Vanderbilt University, a discussion on Growth and Empowerment; The Rebirth Vol. II Brainwashed with author and advertising genius Tom Burrell held at Tennessee State University; Life, Love, Legacy and Leadership; The Go Further, Go Farther, Go FATHER Fatherhood Initiative at Fisk University, and much more.

Wisdom is very active in the case involving the tragic murder of his father and has been very vocal in the media, with law enforcement, politician, community organizations, and more. He is a proven leader in the community.

D is for Dream. What is your dream, goals or what have you achieved?

My goal is to help men grow spiritually, philosophically, psychologically, emotionally, socially, and financially to find their true identity.  If you take a look at 2 Corinthians 8:7, it speaks to “excelling in everything” in those areas…faith (spiritual), speech and knowledge (philosophical),…complete earnestness (psychological), the love (emotional), others (social), in order that we may become rich (financial), understanding that the word financial is a Latin word where the prefix FIN means complete, or settled up and not necessarily wealthy.  My dream is to see this through to fruition with those I directly (or even indirectly) influence in order that they have that same “cultural capital” to pass on to those they lead.

E is for Education. What is your educational background and how do you use it daily?

I have a Bachelor’s and Master’s Degree in Business Administration / Management Information Systems.  I serve as Senior Manager of Database Administration in Vanderbilt University Information Technology department.  In addition to that, I provide IT consulting services through my own company.  I am a motivational speaker as well, so my dissemination of information to help individuals make intelligent decisions comes in a couple of different forms; technology and human interaction.

R is for Resource. What resources do you bring to the table that makes you unique or stand out?

EdSpeakingIf you trace the lineage from my grandfather, Ed Sr., through to my son, I offer a compelling story for men and our responsibilities as it relates to life, love, legacy, and leadership and how each of us have overachieved in those areas through building good names, character and integrity.  Each of us of was resilient, each with different sets of adversity.  My grandfather’s father died when he was 7, his mother when he was 17, and he had nothing more than a 7th grade education, however he traveled the world by sea 5 times over; raised 8 children (6 boys) who were college educated and/or decorated military veterans; and built a trucking business on good character.  My father during a time of racial divide was close lifelong friends with Olympic great Wilma Rudolph, a decorated paratrooper of the 82nd Airborne Parachute Infantry and the all-black 555th Airborne Parachute Battalion (Tripe Nickles), the 1st African American to teach at Clarksville High School in Clarksville, TN after integration, was 1 of 2 of the first African Americans to work in IBMs top secret security clearance facility in Atlantic City, NJ, and went on to become the Director of MIS at Tennessee State University for nearly 40 years.  Myself, I followed my father’s footsteps in Information Systems and after his tragic murder in 2011, I formed a foundation in his name to share with men ideas on legacy and leadership.  My son, followed in Information Systems and Technology as well and was raised in my household, a single parent household, and has risen in excellence.  All of this combined forms a unique story that I share with men on how to manifest through identities.

R is for Ready. When did you realize you were ready for what you are doing now?

When my son was born, I felt my father had equipped me with everything in life to be a good man, a great leader, and do great things, and fatherhood would be my change to prove it.  It catapulted me into a role that was greater than just heading my own household but in leading young boys and men connected to my son who lacked male leadership at home.  When my father was murdered I was certain that my purpose was to do exactly what I had been doing and was to continue demonstrating to men through my actions and also my words as a motivational speaker as to exactly what it took to become a real man.

uchenI is for Individual. Name at least one individual in your network that others should learn more about and why?

Uchendi Nwani.  He has a very intriguing story about his fall, then rise to becoming a respected leader and entrepreneur.  We grew up together in the same church where his stepfather was the Pastor. We went to high school together, and have been friends for years. Uchendi is the Author of “The Millionaire Barber Stylist” and the owner of International Barber and Style which is largest barber college in the United States.

C is for Challenges. What challenges have you had to overcome?

The adversity through the murder of my father, my hero, in late 2011 has been and is my greatest challenge.  I believe I have taken it on with resilience and have ensured that the works that he began continue in the likeness of his good name.  I am still engulfed deeply in the continued investigation into my father’s murder and I am strengthened each day by my purpose to lead my family through this to and get back to more peaceful days.

K is for Key. What keys to success can you leave for upcoming entrepreneurs and leaders?

Success comes in building a good name, character and integrity and understanding that success is less about accomplishments and more about the manifestation of your identity as a visionary, a leader, and an overachiever.  Success is also understanding that good leadership is not about you as much as it is about them, those who follow.  Your goal is to develop those who follow you, making them leaders, some of whom are equipped to pass your vision on to in order to keep your vision alive.

Visit Ed Wisdom III for more information.


You Can Help SPONSOR Derrick Hayes Next 2 Events

February 1, 2014

TSUDerrick Hayes is offering Individuals, Entrepreneurs, Businesses and Organizations a chance to SPONSOR his upcoming events. In the 1st Quarter of 2014 Derrick Hayes will be speaking to college students in the states of Tennessee and Pennsylvania on the topic of “Building Relationships in College and Out” and he wants to take you along with him.

You can now market you and what you do in two places for one fee.

On February 28th, 2014 Derrick Hayes will be speaking on the campus of Middle Tennessee State University in Murfreesboro, TN at the 2014 Best Practice for Student Success, Inclusion & Retention Summit.

On March 24th, 2014 Derrick Hayes will be speaking on the campus of Clarion University in Clarion, PA as part of the Martin Luther King, Jr. Legacy Series.

collegespeakerAt each event Derrick Hayes will be giving the audience attendees a handout along with a Sponsorship Page. Each Sponsor will be allowed to have a listing in the handout that can include their company name, contact person, contact information along with how to connect on social media. Sponsors will also have the opportunity to give a DOOR (Derrick Offers Other Resources) Prize that will be raffled off or given away at each event and this will give Sponsors another way to discuss you and what you do. Each Sponsor will also receive a mention on the blogvertisements and Sponsorship Page.

The Sponsorship Fee is $50 and the deadline for both events is February 21st, 2014. If you want to give more or less than the Sponsorship amount click DONATE and let us know if you want to be listed or if you want to remain anonymous.

Contact Derrick Hayes to sponsor his next two events or for more information visit http://www.DerrickHayes.com email info@DerrickHayes.com or call (706) 615-1662. Derrick Hayes, an alumnus of Tennessee State University is available to speak at small and large meetings, church events, academic speaking engagements and workshops.


10 Things I Learned My First Semester

December 13, 2013

AlexisHaddby Alexis Haddock who attends Tennessee State University

This first semester of college has been a rather interesting one. I’ve learned far more than I ever dreamed, not only in the classroom but in life.

1.) Be kind. Be willing to go the extra mile for someone who needs it.

2.) Be accepting. You are never in a position to judge anyone. Take them as they are and accept their differences.

3.) Listen to people. Everyone has a story and ever story deserves to be told. Sometimes, all someone needs is for someone to listen to them.

4.) Forgive, but don’t forget. No matter what transgression someone has committed against you, have it in your heart to forgive them. This is not for their sake, but for yours. You can not live your life with discontent and hate in your heart.

5.) Tell the truth. People will respect your honesty. Don’t mistake being truthful with being rude, however. There is a fine line between the two.

6.) Make friends. Network with everyone. You never know what connections you could have or what memories you could make.

7.) Keep your head up. College(and life for that matter) can be challenging at times, but always know that there is light at the end of the tunnel.

8.) Don’t be “that” person. Don’t be the one to bring everyone down. Build people up. You never know what one kind word could do for someone.

9.) Use all your assets. Don’t turn down help. It could make a big difference in every aspect of your life.

10.) LIVE. Don’t be afraid to try new things. Don’t be afraid to dress up or go out. Be spontaneous. Be excited. Be creative. Be happy. Have fun but be responsible at the same time. Be mature but don’t loose your inner child. Don’t be afraid to make mistakes. Learn from them and move on. Laugh. Smile. Just LIVE.


Derrick Hayes Dream to Speak at Tennessee State University Comes True

September 6, 2013

EncouragementSpeakerAt Tennessee State University, Derrick Hayes started a business with a friend during his First Year Experience with three packs of hot dogs. Selling them to hungry students, Hot Dog Heaven was founded. Helping Paying his way through college with Hot Dogs gave Derrick the inspiration he needed to begin teaching other people how to run a business.

Before graduation Derrick realized that some students were not able to finish school because of financial hardships. This revelation inspired Derrick to help start The Wall of Excellence Scholarship and Development Fund that has helped raise over $500,000.00 so that College of Business students can complete their education.

Derrick Hayes has been a featured speaker at colleges and universities such as Brown Sanders College, Georgia State University, Bowie State University, and Jackson State University but he always dreamed one day that he would be hired to speak at his alma mater Tennessee State University.

On Tuesday September 24th, 2013 at 6 PM the dream of Derrick Hayes will be achieved. At TSU the Women’s and Men’s Centers are combining to bring Hayes in to speak to the student body about the process of “Building Relationships in College and Out.” The event will take place in the 2nd Floor Auditorium in the Harold M. Love, Sr. Student Success Center on the main campus of Tennessee State University.

In college Derrick Hayes learned how to build relationships through selling food and giving back with scholarship opportunities and once he graduated he realized how to help experts, entrepreneurs and celebrities by providing them with publicity opportunities through his blog Today’s Honoree and his world famous DERRICK Interviews.

When Derrick is not speaking or blogging he is writing original quotes for his Android and iPhone application Motivation To Your Mobile that gives subscribers all over the world a new positive word of encouragement right to their phone at the start of each day.

For more information:

Randy Arnold, Director of the Man Center
Tennessee State University
615.963.5119
rarnold2@tnstate.edu

Chandra Norman Lipscomb, M.A., Director of the Women’s Center
Tennessee State University
615-963-4947
clipscomb1@tnstate.edu

Derrick Hayes, an alumnus of Tennessee State University is available for small and large meetings, church events, academic speaking engagements and workshops. Please visit Derrick’s website at http://www.DerrickHayes.com and to book him for a speaking engagement or media event, send an email to info@DerrickHayes.com  or call (706) 615-1662.